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Three questions

Did NHRA know about Mike Edwards physical limitations during the season?

I thought Don Garlits got out of dragsters because the high G-forces, positive on launch and negative on deploying the chutes, were impairing his eyes and causing detached retinas. He is getting in a dragster again that can accelerate as fast as his previous Swamp Rats?!

Is there some sort of follow-up on the Corvette Museum "disaster"? (I will withhold any jokes....)

Dale Tuley
Belvidere, Illinois

Keeping up with the changing times

Burk, I like to think of the NHRA in relation to the current newspaper business. It is a tried and true business that depends on advertisers and subscribers. In today's information age, newspapers and NHRA are struggling with the changes to current society and how information is obtained.

Think that when NHRA started their current TV format, fans had to hunt to try to get the results of an event. Now the results are at your fingertips. There is no need to watch the show. There is no need to read National Dragster a week after the event; all of the stories are in online magazines and blogs.  If there is a crash it is on Facebook/YouTube as soon as it happens  

The other part is TV and how it affects the teams.  I ask, what sounds better, 40,000 fans at the track or only 450,000 viewers on TV? Sponsors like the bigger number. So TV is still important. 

The big question is how do you change and not alienate your core base while attracting new fans to the races, increasing TV ratings, and keeping race teams and sponsors happy, while not being sued by competitors if you make a major change (e.g. Pro Stock Truck).

I have many ideas, but my belief is as long as things are okay, if most tracks are turning a profit, professional racers are happy with the TV package, team owners are getting enough sponsor dollars, and NHRA turns a profit, things will stay the same.

Sincerely,

Roger Nelson
Langhorne, Pennsylvania

PS: You really have to get ESPN3 online and watch those NHRA broadcasts. I can watch it because I am a Verizon subscriber and really enjoy the Friday qualifying show that is streamed live. I am still surprised not many commercials. I believe that, promoted properly, this could be a great way to get the show live and bring excitement back to NHRA. Saturday qualifying live would be a great show.