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It doesn’t have to be perfect

I attended the Friday session in Englishtown... lots of great racing, nice weather and cold beers. My suggestion for better racing and for larger fields would be to just stop pouring glue on the track and let the crews and drivers adjust. For too many years a little traction compound out to 60 feet was the answer. Now, the whole surface must be sticky enough to catch flies.

Take away the traction and crew chiefs would be forced to back down on the enormous power they are making nowadays... and at ridiculous costs. One shouldn't have to be a billionaire to compete. This would allow the racing to go back to 1320, where it should be. I was watching from the top end and before you knew it, the fuel cars were done with their runs. Let the drivers back pedal and save a run... it worked just fine back in the earlier days, why not again? And I'm sure track operators everywhere would be happy not incurring the cost of the "glue".

Just a thought.

Mark Trembley
Pittsfield, Massachusetts

Fans can see the future; why can’t NHRA?

I totally agree with Jeff’s comments regarding factory involvement verses no exposure from NHRA. It’s something that’s been lacking from the big three for too long. Now that they have stepped up their involvement you would think NHRA would give them a little exposure. Not to be.

Is it just me or does the NHRA lack foresight on what is good for the sport? I believe that NHRA is really missing out on TV ratings by not televising fast door car classes i.e. Pro Mod, Factory Stock, Comp Eliminator. Just a 5-7 minute segment on these classes with some commenting on rules, engines, etc. might expand their TV ratings. But they have to have time allotments that are pleasing to the average Joe. Not 11:00 or 1:00 am.

I think they have really missed the boat by not allowing Pro Mod to be a professional points class. Enough of the overexposure of mega funded professional teams. Bring in the underdogs and spoilers for some fresh insight on their programs. I like it when the little guy wins! It’s time for some change. NHRA, get back to what made the sport what it used to be.

Kirk Atkins
Palmetto, Florida