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Bring Pro Stock into the 21st Century

Concerning your (March) poll. You need to separate the nitro funny car from the Pro Stocks. I fully understand why (and Austin Coil clearly pointed out why) the current funny cars cannot be made to resemble show room cars. Pro Stock, on the other hand SHOULD! NHRA needs to get rid of the hood scope by going to fuel injection (period, no further excuses). Carburetors haven't come in production cars since 1987 (about 16 years ago; time to join the "future").

Many will not like this, but Pro Stock should use any racing engine in any car (ethanol fuel and fuel injected; no superchargers or turbos). Shouldn't need GM motors for GM cars (they really are not GM motors, more like Force's "Ford Motors"). In this manner, every body style (Ford, GM, Dodge, etc) will become competitive. Currently we only have GM and Dodge cars that are competitive. There should be Toyota and other such cars in Pro Stock. The "so-called Detroit deal" is long gone. Fans drive all models and makes, so let’s have them represented. Make them all rear wheel drive (like now).

Richard Stedman
Oakland, California

Rich, while the Burkster didn’t do so hot in math classes (too much time spent reading hot rod mags instead of textbooks), he’s pretty sure 1987 was 26 years ago, not 16. Of course that only makes the point more significant.

Forrest, are you listening?

Burkster, need NHRA to go to Mavtv. Quit getting shitty air times. I'll watch tennis when I want to if any. Let's help Lucas and pay him back for his investment in the sport.

Sil Cervantes

Drag racing is the Rodney Dangerfield of sports

Jeff, I agree with you 100%. It stinks that a sport with such a long history of being broadcast (since the early '60s, if you count Wide World of Sports) has to endure such shoddy treatment by the current broadcast network.

Dale Tuley
Belvidere, Illinois