In the last couple of years Forrest Lucas has consolidated the various drag boat sanctioning bodies into one circuit, gotten it national TV exposure, and has made efforts to move all of the races off of unsafe or marginally safe tracks. (Forrest referred to some of the former tracks as ponds.)

Now the sport has a purpose-built drag boat lake featuring all the amenities of a first class auto-racing facility thanks to Forrest Lucas. And he has a dedicated crew ready to build more.

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I cannot remember a time when so many rumors or press releases were being circulating about “motorsports complexes” that are just weeks/months away from opening. Or that needed just a few more permits to be filed and approved so the dirt movers could get started. Yet in the last five years I can’t think of any of these proposed tracks that has actually been built or opened, or if they were, are still open. Frankly, I can’t imagine anyone building and opening a new “Motorsports Complex” in the current economic times.

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Recently I’ve noticed a trend of sorts where we here at DRO are getting post-race results from supposedly big events or sanctioning organizations in which the winner and runner-up of a drag race is listed with no speeds, ETs, or the drivers’ reaction times. Drag racing results without stats are absolutely worthless. It’s all about the numbers, folks!

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Speed. It is still a problem with the NHRA nitro cars. In 2008, the last season for quarter-mile nitro racing, Tony Schumacher’s Top Fueler held the speed record at 336.15 mph and Jack Beckman the Funny  Car mark at 333.66. Fast forward four years and lop 320 feet off the distance. Spencer Massey holds the TF speed record at 328.62 mph and Beckman is still the speed king of the FC class at 318.99.

At this point, are the only reasons for the 1,000-foot rule the extra 320 feet they now have to stop and the money they save on parts? Because it can’t be the decreased speed.